Pastor Q&A // Part 13

QUESTION: How do you find the balance between ministering to married LGBT couples without sounding judgmental?

ANSWER: PASTOR ZACH

Too often when we think of others, Christians or non-Christians, straight or gay, we first think about what they do rather than who they are. We jump straight to the sin they commit. Stop and ask yourself, “What do they think that I think about them?” They probably think that you judge them. That you look down on them. And too often our thoughts follow that uncaring script. 

In reality, you have a higher view of your unbelieving friends than they can ever have of themselves. All people, Christians or non-Christians, gay or straight, are created in the image of God. We need to ponder often this truth. All people are worthy of respect because they are made in the image God (James 3). As image bearers of God, they are a part of our society, and common grace means they have much to offer. Their job, their hobbies, and their talents are all gifts from God. So rejoice where you can rejoice. Being made in the image of God means that they eternal, which is why you care for them deeply. As created beings, they are also subject to their creator and must live according to his design. This final truth—that we are all subject to our Creator--is the foundation upon which we build the more serious conversations. 

And too often we focus only on the big ways to minister to people and miss a thousand little ways to serve.  For example, what does it mean to reflect Christ well when you go grocery shopping? Get into an hour-long apologetic and evangelistic conversation, obviously. Or so we think. But God gives us little ways to minister daily, and we ought to focus more on those. Be the only kind customer who smiles. Get off your phone and treat the cashier like a human. Quit treating the other shoppers like competitors. Practice honoring Christ in a thousand little things this week. When it comes to LGBT couples, build your ministry upon the truth that all are created in God’s image and begin with ministering in the little ways.